#59: SHADOWS & LIGHT (Vue)
#58: ADVANCED DIRT MAPPING (Vue)
#57: SSS IN VUE 9, AND THE "SPECKLE" PROBLEM
#56: THE DEVIL IS IN THE DETAIL OF ART
#55: FIXING POSER CLOTHING
#54: MAKING "FOREST WAR - GOBLIN SHAMAN"
#53: MAKING A STUDIO RENDER FOR VUE
(and other apps)
#49: NEBULA MKIII (Vue)
#48: RENDER SETTINGS FOR VUE (Vue)
#47: POSTWORK - MAKING A RENDER INTENSE (Any)
#46: MAKING RIVERS THAT FOLLOW TERRAIN HEIGHTS (Vue or Bryce)

MAXWELL RENDER: MULTILIGHT

This is simply an explanation of what "multilighting" is in Maxwell renderer, and why it's so damned useful! :)

I start with a simple scene made in Rhino, sorry for the quality I used very old emitter materials (lights), rather than newer ones, so they kind of suck! ;)

The principle of Multilighting and Maxwell renderer is, once you have finished yowr render, you can still edit the scene's lighting!
Before you export the image, you can alter the film speed and shutter speed of the camera, just like a real one, and also adjust the inividual light sources of the scene.

This is the scene, now note, you can alter the sliders for camera's shutter speed and film speed, and the 3 light source's power, and the S M R buttons undermeath can turn lights to "solo" (so that's the only light that will show), etc

we have 3 light sources:

-the Environment light showing through the doorway (a standard lightdome)
-The flourescent tube light near the doorway
-The desk lamp hovering over the deck.

Important note: Maxwell lights behave exactly like REAL lights! their temperature, wattage and the surface area of the object all work correctly as if they were real.

One point of this is, say you make a huge light source, a football perhaps, and set it to have a 40 watt light power...well, 40 watts from such a huge surface area is not gonna be very powerful and thus be very diffuse! But if it's from a small light bulb, it will shine bright. Thus, you must always work in real world units with Maxwell.

Also, you have to turn on multilighting in your render settings for it to work. It increases render time, alas, but well worth it.

Say I want to test this scene, and see what happens if only the flourescent light is on? I can do so easily by hitting the "S" for solo button, at it's slider.

Now remember, the render has finished, this is all being done, after the render has finished! You just need to hit the "Refresh" button for the changes to take effect.

Now I can see how the flourescent light affects the scene, and alter it's power if I wish.

Here, the flourescent light is boosted up in power 447%
This shows only the environment light turned on, so, you could see what a room looks like during the day time when no lights are needed.

I hope you find this of use! :)

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All original art, writing on this site, copyright of Steven James, "Silverblade the Enchanter" ©2012