#59: SHADOWS & LIGHT (Vue)
#58: ADVANCED DIRT MAPPING (Vue)
#57: SSS IN VUE 9, AND THE "SPECKLE" PROBLEM
#56: THE DEVIL IS IN THE DETAIL OF ART
#55: FIXING POSER CLOTHING
#54: MAKING "FOREST WAR - GOBLIN SHAMAN"
#53: MAKING A STUDIO RENDER FOR VUE
(and other apps)
#49: NEBULA MKIII (Vue)
#48: RENDER SETTINGS FOR VUE (Vue)
#47: POSTWORK - MAKING A RENDER INTENSE (Any)
#46: MAKING RIVERS THAT FOLLOW TERRAIN HEIGHTS (Vue or Bryce)

FIXING POSER CLOTHING


What do I mean by "Fixing Poser clothing"?
Well, I mean, altering it with magnets, or displacements, to fix the common problems of arms, elbows etc poking through clothing,
or to cut sleeves off a shirt to make it into a T-shirt, or add wrinkles and wear that makes a piece of clothing look real, rather than flat and unbelievable!

Also, postwork helps hide problems, too ;)

Obviously you can fix many issues of "clothing poke through" by good use of the object's morphs inside Poser, but I'm talking of other things here.

Now, please note, this also applies to ANY app you take your Poser into! You can do some tweaks, like add displacement
or transprency in other apps, of course, but I'm showing you it in Poser to begin with for simplicities sake.
I use Vue, mostly, so swapping in transparency and displacement maps is easy.

These are really damn good ways to add variance to a model, so you can change the same model in many ways to fit your
needs! :)

I'd assume DAZ Studio does much the same things, but I'm not familiar with it, I'm afraid, sorry :)

In the picture above, I used a "magnet" in Poser to pull up her right trouser thigh, to fix it, preventing it from sagging so much that it was below her flesh, and thus obviously impossible in the real world.
see pic at bottom of this page to see how the way the model is without fixing it

I used displacement to add wrinkles on her trousers, most notably on her left thigh

In Photoshop, I added wear to the texture of her trousers, so the cuff of her trouser legs is faded and worn, as you'd expect from worn clothing. Few Poser clothing props come with worn textures.

Using transparency, I hide much of her trousers from being rendered, thus making it appear that she was wearing shorts, without having to delete any parts of the model, a most useful trick to remember!

In postwork, in Photoshop, I composited two renders to hide the fact displacement pushed the trouser wrinkles so high, the trousers pushed through her dangling belt!


TRANSPARENCY

Transparency is the simplest trick to change and fix clothing.
Using greyscale images, you cna set where areas of transparency will be, converting trousers to shorts, in this case.
Likewise, you can make torn holes and other useful things.

Remember to keep edges SHARP with most fabrics, no blurring, or even anti-laising at times, as that would look fake, giving
the edges "fuzzy" looks, which aren't possible with many real world things.

ROLL MOUSE OVER ON IMAGE BELOW TO SEE
EFFECT OF SIMPLE TRANSPARENCY
MAP USED ON THE MATERIAL


That was very simply done, using this image I made in Photoshop to drive the transparency of the material.
I made it simply by loading in the texture used for her pants into Phhotoshop, then using that as a guide.
Black = transparent.

TROUSER TRANSPARENCY IMAGE


DISPLACEMENT

Displacement is like bump mapping, it pushes the surface of the object up or down, however:
bump mapping is "fake" it's merely an illusion and so is n use at fixing problems,
Displacement REALLY pushes an object up/down, in/out.

This means it can add wrinkles, push problem areas above skin that pokes through etc.

It does have issues though:

  1. Not all render engines can handle displacement. Only more recent ones do: Poser 6+, Vue 6+, etc.

  2. It addes a lot more polygons and increases render time.

  3. You need to make a greyscale image to drive the displacement. White = highest point possible, black = lowest point possible, true mid gresy (128/128/128 RGB) is the middle level.

  4. If you want very fine precision, with no "stair stepping" caused by 8 bit colour limitations, you need to use specially made and saved 16 bit images in .tif .tga or .psd format, and again not all render engines handle that. Usually though, standard 8 bit images will be ok if you remember to smooth out gradiations between areas, simple gaussian blur over several pixels is enough.

As a guide to work out your displacement image, just use the texture of the part itself, for example, the trouser's image file.
you cna find that by going to the Mateiral room in Poser, set it to SIMPLE, not "Advanced"
select the correct object, then select the exact material to work from.
Right click on the image and it iwll show you i't sname.
You cna find the image's whereabouts on your drive by hitting the little down pointing triangle, then scrolling down until you find your image, take a note of it's location
then you cna load it up in Photoshop or whatever.

NOTE:
You can export ALL the files in a Poser scene to a specific folder very easily, this will let you find and work with any textures you want quite easily.

To do so, in psoer 8, use "SCRIPTS" ---> "UTILITY" ---> "CollectSceneInventory" then save


This is the image I made, to create displacement on the elven archer'spants,
thereby adding realism of how you'd expect pants to sag and be wrinkled
Note most of it is mid-grey, where it won't push up or down.


ROLL MOUSE OVER TO SEE DISPLACEMENT
ON TROUSERS, NOTE HOW IT POKES UP
TRHOUGH THE DANGLING BELT!


WEAR, GRIME AND DIRT

A major factor in realism is plain old dirt, wear and tear. People keep making the same mistake by overlooking this!

Now, it's fine when you are doing a beautiful image where realism isn't an issue, But where realism is an issue,
never ever overlook the absolute necessity of wear, tear grime and dirt.
It's why I keep going on about my "Dirt Map" material for Vue: it's important ;)

Adding dirt/wear to a Poser character's clothes is quite easy:

  • Open the texture for the clothing in Photoshop or similar app

  • Make a new layer, then paint on dirt, grime etc using suitable brushes and colours.
    Typically I'll put "wear, fading under the sun etc, material effect" on layer set to OVERLAY
    Then using say a "sponge" brush and a white colour, I'll build up where I think wear, sun fading etc etc
    would build up.

Note that wear and scratches you have to be precise about placement for realism: around cuffs, high points etc.
Where as dirt you can be more sloppy about and use procedural materials if wish.

I can't show you the exact image I used to make the elven archer's pants, as the texture is copyright
of it's creator, of course. So you'll just need to learn this yourselves by practice, it's not too hard to learn :)

Similar techniques can add dirt, rain stains etc


RUN MOUSE OVER IMAGE BELOW
TO SEE WEAR OFF & ON

POSTWORK

As you can see in some of the pictures above, the displacement pushes the trousers up higher, and pushes through the dangling part of the belt.

This isn't too hard to all you need to do is render your initial image.
Then turn off the displacement in the material editor.
Re-render image

Then open up the original render in your favorite 2D app, like Photoshop.
Load the re-render image up, paste it into a new layer above the original

delete eveyrthing except the small part of the re-rendered image where the dangling part is obscured on the layer below.

With programs that let you select an area on the image to re-render it's even easier, just re-render the small, important bit, saving time!
However, make sure the layers are directly overlaying each other properly, turn visibility off/on for layers to get them lined up right, if needed.

Variations on this theme can deal with fixing many problems, or adding special effects, even.


RUN MOUSE OVER TO SEE
BEFORE & AFTER OF POSTWORK


MAGNETS

Magnets are a sneaky way Poser can pull areas of an object in directions you want.

First you must select the exact part of the object you wish to alter, in this case, the right thigh of her trousers.

next, use "Object", "Create magnet" to create your magnet.

magnets come in three parts:

MAGNET BASE: this is the "handle" of where the magnet is, shrink, rotate, pull etc this part first when setitng the entire magnet system up relative to what you wish to effect, NOT the big red magnet itself, leave the magnet for tweaks on how it actually pulls the object.

MAGNET ZONE: the sphere of influence of where the magnet will effect things. Anyhting outside will NOT be affected, remember this!
It's what gets me confused with the blasted thing more often than not 'cause I forget ;)
Shink or enlarge to make it effect more or less of the object.

MAGNET: the magnet itself, you can pull this away from the base, or move, rotate it etc to give more unusual effects.

Using magnets takes a bit of getting used to, but allow a great way to easily fix many problems! :)

This is what how the model looks without the magnet
I hope you find this of use! :)

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All original art, writing on this site, copyright of Steven James, "Silverblade the Enchanter" ©2012